Category Archives: Writers Journey

2015 Reds, 1990 Score style: Tyler Stephenson (1st Round Pick)

Tyler Stephenson catcher Kennesaw Mountain High School Georgia 1st Round Draft Pick Cincinnati Reds

The Cincinnati Reds drafted Kennesaw Mountain High School (Georgia) catcher Tyler Stephenson with the eleventh pick of the first round in the Major League draft last night. Stephenson promptly changed his Twitter biography from “Committed to Georgia Tech” to “Professional baseball player for the Cincinnati Reds,” and then posted the following…

tylertweet

I can’t wait to see this kid in Cincinnati. Hope his hand doesn’t hurt too badly after meeting the Cuban Missile.

Tyler Stephenson 1st Round Draft Pick Cincinnati Reds

2015 Reds, 1990 Score style: Kristopher Negron @KNegs17

Kristopher Negron

Short on time this week, so I’m not sure if I’ll be here to post every day or not. Here’s utility man Kristopher Negron who is able to play just about every position on the field and give the regulars a day off from time to time. He has played at least nine innings at every position this year except catcher and pitcher. Negron was drafted by the Red Sox in 2006, acquired by the Reds in 2009 for Alex Gonzalez and cash.

2015 ex-Reds @JElmo10 @Encadwin @YonderalonsoU, 1990 Score style: Jake Elmore (Tampa Bay Rays), Edwin Encarnacion (Toronto Blue Jays), Yonder Alonso (San Diego Padres)

The Reds are absolutely horrible right now. After leading the Padres 7-3 yesterday, Tony Cingrani gave up a grand slam and then Jumbo Diaz allowed a couple more runs to score…and another loss went in the books. Seriously, if your offense scores seven runs, you oughtta be able to win a few games!!! My frustration level is beyond belief right now. So let’s look at a couple of guys that used to be Redlegs…

Jake Elmore

First we have Jake Elmore, who is currently employed by the Tampa Bay Rays. Elmore was drafted by the Marlins in 2007, but did not sign. He was then drafted in 2008 by the Diamondbacks, and he made his big league debut with Arizona in 2012. After that season, he was selected off waivers by the Astros, and played the 2013 campaign in Houston. He was then selected off waivers by the White Sox, who sold him to Oakland. But he did not make a big league appearance in 2014 until September with the Reds, who had selected him off waivers from the A’s. Granted free agency on November 4, 2014, the Reds signed him on November 5, but then on November 7 he was selected off waivers by the Pirates. Elmore was again granted free agency in February—why the Pirates took him in the first place no one will ever know—and signed with the Tampa Bay Rays.

This is not Elmore’s only custom card in the world. He is also featured in the very cool TSR set, as a SuperStar Special card no less.

Edwin Encarnacion

Continuing with guys whose last name starts with the letter “E,” we have Toronto superstar Edwin Encarnacion. His stats are down a bit this year, but he’s still driving the ball far and flipping his bat like a pro.

And I have just realized that I skipped over three other ex-Reds that I already made cards for but haven’t posted yet, including Yonder Alonso, who hit that grand slam yesterday to tie the game against the Reds. GRRRRRRRR…

Yonder Alonso

Fun Cards: 1938 Goudey Chris Sabo and Todd Frazier (original artwork) @Reds @RedsMuseum @FlavaFraz21 @Goggles17

Chris Sabo 1938 Goudey

Todd Frazier might be my favorite active third baseman, but he has quite a bit of catching up to do if he wants to replace Chris Sabo at the top of my favorites list. In 1988, when I was in sixth grade, I interviewed Sabo (via telephone) for a school homework assignment. Mrs. Gracey wanted us to write about someone we admired, and most of the other kids chose their dads or grandpas. And it’s not that I don’t love my dad, I do! He instilled in me a love for baseball that, though it has waned from time to time, I still cherish. But I wanted to be different from the other kids, so I called the Reds’ general offices after school and asked to speak to the rookie third baseman.

The operator was very kind, took my name and number and the reason for my call. I hung up the phone and headed out back to shoot some hoops. Not much later, my mom started rapping on the kitchen window, motioning for me to come inside for a telephone call. I came in, and Chris Sabo was on the other end.

I asked him about his favorite team growing up (the Tigers), his favorite player (Al Kaline), and what kind of car he drove (Ford Escort). He was extremely polite, very humble, and even left two tickets for a game a couple of weeks out for my dad and I. We got to sit in the “blue seats” (the good seats back then) with other players’ wives and girlfriends. That was pretty cool.

So, Mr. Frazier, though I will vote for you every year for the All-Star Game, and I will call you my favorite current third baseman, unless you come over for dinner and drop a couple of All-Star tickets off, Mr. Sabo will remain at the top of my list.

Todd Frazier

Elefanté by BulletBoys (2015)

BULLETBOYS ELEFANTE

Elefanté
by BulletBoys
Cleopatra/Deadline Records, 2015
40 minutes

Hard rock bands come and go, but there are a few names that consistently reappear from time to time. Though Marq Torien is the only original member left in the band, BulletBoys are back with a new record to the delight of hair metal freaks everywhere, even if it sounds little like the “Smooth Up In Ya” era. Torien enlists superb musicians on Elefanté: Nick Rozz (The Tattooed Millionaires) on guitar, Chad MacDonald (Jani Lane, Kevin Dubrow) on bass, and Shawn Duncan (Odin, DC4) on drums.

Together they have created a solid record that hearkens back to the glory days while updating the sound for a modern audience. For the most part Elefanté sounds more in line with a Hinder record than Poison, but it rocks just the same. The record opens with a dark guitar riff on “Rollover,” setting the stage for a barrage of hard rock perfect for those hungry for a heavy (but not too heavy) sound.

The best tracks are the rockers “Rollover” and “Symphony” and the ballad “Kin Folk.” “Drop Your Weapon” has an awesome groove that will have you singing along by the second chorus; unfortunately it is ruined by a couple of f-bombs near the end. Hearing the group cover another artist’s song is no surprise; other than “Smooth Up In Ya,” the BulletBoys’ most memorable songs from their early career were cover songs. Here, the Elton John cover is performed well, but a better song could have certainly been chosen. Those are the two songs that disappoint the most on Elefanté.

Despite those missteps, Elefanté is a strong hard rock record that BulletBoys fans will appreciate.

You can preview “Rollover” and “Symphony” at BulletBoysOfficial.com.

Tracklist:
1. Rollover
2. Tsunami
3. Symphony
4. The Villain
5. Kin Folk
6. Saving You From Me
7. As Dumb As
8. Superhuman Girl
9. Drop Your Weapon
10. B**** is Back (Elton John cover)
11. Elefanté

Learn more about Cleopatra/Deadline Records.

Learn more about BulletBoys.

Purchase BulletBoys – Elefanté.

Random Awesomeness (part 192)

Random Awesomeness

Purchase Slaughter – Stick It To Ya.

Coming soon…

I was going to post my review of the new Bulletboys record, Elefanté, today, but still have some finishing touches to put on it. It might be up tomorrow, or possibly Thursday.

I am also working my way through Jeff Katz’s Split Season: 1981. It’s a very heady book, detailing the negotiations between the players and owners while examining the events of the season, including Fernando Valenzuela‘s sensational rookie campaign. That review should be posted either Thursday or Friday, depending on how much time I have to devote to reading over the next couple of days.

On Friday, the new TWJ “revamped” design will debut at TWJ cards on tumblr. But I want to give you a sneak peek, so here is card #1, Jimmy Rollins wearing his Dodgers digs.

001 Jimmy Rollins

You can view all of the cards posted over the past several years of your favorite team by typing http://twjcards.tumblr.com/tagged/los-angeles-dodgers into your browser window, replacing “los-angeles-dodgers” with your favorite team name (dashes where spaces should be).

Heard But Not Seen by Denny Dressman (2015)

Heard But Not Seen Pete Rose Ray Fosse play at the plate 1970 All-Star Gaem Denny Dressman book

Heard But Not Seen
by Denny Dressman
ComServ Books, 2015
128 pages

In the Cincinnati area, it is one of the most talked about plays in Reds history: Pete Rose barreling over Ray Fosse in the 1970 All-Star Game to secure an extra-inning victory for the National League. The exhibition contest was hosted by the Reds in their brand new Riverfront Stadium just two weeks after the team played their first game there. President Richard M. Nixon was in attendance, throwing out the first pitch and causing extra security measures which prevented some members of the media, including Denny Dressman, to miss seeing the final innings.

Award winning author Dressman’s Heard But Not Seen: Richard Nixon, Frank Robinson and The All-Star Game’s most debated play is an excellent look back at that night from a different point of view. Dressman and other members of the media who were assigned to interview players in the locker rooms had to leave the press box in order to use the elevator, which was going to be shut down by the Secret Service for the President’s use.

When they arrived underneath the stadium, however, there was a technical glitch allowing only audio of the game to reach the reporters. Many of the stories filed in the papers the next day were not eyewitness accounts, but crafted from interviews with the players after the game. Dressman followed Baltimore outfielder Frank Robinson around the clubhouse, listening to him talk to other players, including Fosse, bringing together divergent opinions to write his story for The Cincinnati Enquirer headlined “Robby Raps Pete.”

While the original article is not reprinted in this book, there is plenty to entertain and educate the reader. Dressman gives a history of All-Star Games in Cincinnati prior to 1970, the transition from Crosley Field to Riverfront Stadium, the intensity of Rose, the baseball fandom of President Nixon, and other famous plays at the plate. Heard But Not Seen is a unique look back at one of the most famous baseball plays ever, short and sweet and highly entertaining.

Learn more about ComServ Books.

Purchase Heard But Not Seen by Denny Dressman.

2015 Reds, 1990 Score style: Brayan Pena & 2015 ex-Reds, 1990 Score style: Ryan Hanigan

Brayan Pena

I have nothing against Brayan Pena personally. He is hitting well this year and filling in nicely while Devin Mesoraco is off injured. But when Pena was signed, it meant another catcher had to leave…

Ryan Hanigan

Shortly after Pena was signed in 2013, Ryan Hanigan was dealt to Tampa Bay in a three-team trade. I was a huge fan of Hanigan while he was in Cincinnati, and was very sad to see him go. This past winter, the Rays sent him to the Padres in another three-team trade, and later the same day the Padres shipped him to Boston.

Blurryface by Twenty One Pilots (2015)

Twenty One Pilots Blurryface

Blurryface
Twenty One Pilots
Fueled By Ramen, 2015
52 minutes

Twenty One Pilots’ major label release, Vessel, was a fresh sound in 2013 with little filler. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for the follow-up, Blurryface. There are some very good songs on this album, and even two great ones. But the filler is overbearing. In “Lane Boy,” Tyler Joseph himself sings, “Honest, there’s a few songs on this record that feel common.”

Blurryface starts strong with an in-your-face slam poetry rocker, “Heavydirtysoul,” followed by the angst-ridden “Stressed Out.” The third track, “Ride,” is a tolerable diversion from the norm, displaying a reggae influence. If that was the only instance of Jamaican flavor on Blurryface, it would be excusable, but Tyler Joseph and Josh Dun return to that island music far too often (“Lane Boy,” “Message Man,” “Polarize” are just a few of the other infected songs). “Fairly Local” brings the listener back to the alternative rock, and the single “Tear in My Heart” is a standout single. “Doubt” is the only somewhat memorable song of the next four, with a sound that seems like a leftover from Vessel, while the excellent “We Don’t Believe What’s On TV” is reminiscent of the now-classic “House of Gold.” Of the final three tracks, “Goner” is probably the most memorably with its brooding lyrics, but “Hometown” has more of a radio-friendly appeal though it sounds nothing like a Twenty One Pilots song at all. “Not Today” also has a good hook and the insecure lyrics will play well with the young fan base.

Blurryface is a good album, but is most certainly a step back from Vessel. “Tear In My Heart” and “We Don’t Believe What’s On TV” are the essential tracks, while “Heavydirtysoul,” “Stressed Out,” and “Not Today” are the second tier. The rest, in Joseph’s own words, “feel common.”

Tracklist:
1. Heavydirtysoul
2. Stressed Out
3. Ride
4. Fairly Local
5. Tear In My Heart
6. Lane Boy
7. The Judge
8. Doubt
9. Polarize
10. We Don’t Believe What’s On TV
11. Message Man
12. Hometown
13. Not Today
14. Goner

Learn more about Fueled By Ramen.

Learn more about Twenty One Pilots.

Purchase Blurryface by Twenty One Pilots.

TWJ cards are getting “revamped” soon…

Kenny Rogers (the country music singer, not the pitcher) sang, “You gotta know when to hold ’em, know when to fold ’em, know when to walk away, know when to run.” In the case of the 2015 TWJ card design, it’s time to fold ’em and walk away. It is dull and uninspiring, and I just can’t bring myself to continue the current design. There are a handful more cards already made, and they will continue to post on the tumblr page through next Thursday, June 4. TWJ 2015 will end with card #65 at that time.

Jace Peterson

But…I ain’t quitting. Nope, no way. A new “2015 TWJ revamped” design has already been created, and will make its debut on Friday, June 5! Be sure you are following TWJ cards on tumblr to see the new cards as they are unveiled each day!

Random Awesomeness (part 191)

Random Awesomeness

Purchase Brownout Presents Brown Sabbath.

Napoleon Wasn’t Short and St. Patrick Wasn’t Irish: When History Gets It Wrong by Andrea Barham (2015)

Napoleon wasn't short

Napoleon Wasn’t Short and St. Patrick Wasn’t Irish:
When History Gets It Wrong

by Andrea Barham
Michael O’Mara, 2015
192 pages

If you haven’t already forgotten all the history you learned in high school, you can forget it now. Andrea Barham takes a number of historical “facts” to task in her latest offering, Napoleon Wasn’t Short and St. Patrick Wasn’t Irish: When History Gets It Wrong. This neat little book offers short discussions on such varied topics as women gladiators, women popes, and the wives of Henry VIII. Did Abraham Lincoln really write the Gettysburg Address on the back of an envelope? Did Paul Revere cry, “The British are coming!” on his way to Concord? Was Captain James Cook really eaten by cannibals in Hawaii? These questions are examined by Barham, but sometimes a definitive answer is still just out of reach.

History buffs will get a kick out of Napoleon Wasn’t Short and St. Patrick Wasn’t Irish, though I doubt the myths that have been propagated—sometimes over the course of centuries—will be disbelieved by many now.

Learn more about Michael O’Mara.

Purchase Napoleon Wasn’t Short and St Patrick Wasn’t Irish: When History Gets it Wrong by Andrea Barham.

2015 Reds, 1990 Score style: @MikeLeake44

Mike Leake baseball card

It’s usually July before I give up on the Reds, but I couldn’t tell you what their current record is this year. Maybe .500? No idea. Hang on, I’ll look it up…

18-21. Tied for 3rd place with the Bucs. Yikes. Eight games out of first. Smh.

Mike Leake has been one of my favorite pitchers since he debuted in 2010. He has never been the ace of the staff, and probably never will be. But he’s a go-getter and wants to win every game. His ERA so far this year is only 3.62, which really isn’t awful at all. In five full seasons, he has only finished with an ERA over 4.00 twice; his lowest was 3.37 in 2013. Unfortunately he doesn’t get a whole lot of run support behind his effort, so his record is 2-2 this year.

Leake isn’t scheduled to pitch again until Friday night against the Indians in Cleveland. The Tribe is even more pathetic than the Reds have been so far this year. The Battle for Ohio should be a real blast. [/sarcasm]

Pedro by Pedro Martinez and Michael Silverman (2015) @45PedroMartinez @HMHCo

Pedro

Pedro
by Pedro Martinez and Michael Silverman
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015
336 pages

Growing up, Pedro Martinez was always an underdog. He was smaller than the other kids, shorter, not as strong. His brother Ramon Martinez was a dominant pitcher, a highly prized prospect for the Los Angeles Dodgers. Pedro was often seen as nothing more than Ramon’s little brother. Despite success in the Dodgers’ farm system, he never got the respect he believed he deserved. It was not until he was traded to the Montreal Expos that Pedro was finally seen as his own man, as he dominated National League hitters north of the border.

In his autobiography, written with Michael Silverman, Pedro relates his experiences as a young man in the Dominican Republic who looked up to his big brother Ramon, wanting to follow in his footsteps to the major leagues. Pedro surpassed all expectations by becoming a Hall of Famer.

Pedro is not a game-by-game breakdown of his career, but a general overview of his seasons with some highlights sprinkled in. He deals with his reputation as a headhunter, sometimes referred to as “Senor Plunk.” He also talks about how he felt overlooked in the the 1999 MVP race and the 2002 Cy Young voting, though he does admit Ivan Rodriguez and Barry Zito had stellar years as well.

In a short chapter dealing with steroids, Pedro expresses disappointment but not resentment toward those who used performance enhancing drugs. He says he was tempted in 1992 when he was in the minor leagues, calling himself “the perfect candidate to take steroids,” but declined after learning the side effects, and states that once he reached the major leagues he was never offered steroids. For those looking for dirt on formerly unnamed users, Pedro does not go there. All of the names mentioned in the chapter are already widely known.

There is so much more that Pedro writes about: learning from Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale, “fighting” with Don Zimmer, his gameday routine and the art of pitching. Pedro is an entertaining autobiography, as the pitcher does not hold back in sharing his opinions of teammates, managers, and opponents. Fans will enjoy the behind-the-scenes look that Pedro offers, though it is not a dirt-digging, tell-all book.

Learn more about Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Purchase Pedro by Pedro Martinez and Michael Silverman.

On The Road With The Oak Ridge Boys by Joseph S. Bonsall (2015)

Oak Ridge Boys book

On The Road With The Oak Ridge Boys
by Joseph S. Bonsall
Harvest House Publishers, 2015
272 pages

I fondly remember listening to the Oak Ridge Boys with my sister as she drove me around in her Mercury Lynx when I was a little kid. Songs such as “Elvira” and “American Made” remind me of a simpler time. Tenor Joseph S. Bonsall reminisces about some of the Boys’ biggest songs, best fans, and blessed moments in his recently released memoir, On The Road With The Oak Ridge Boys.

Bonsall covers a number of topics in the memoir, from the Boys’ non-musical interests and the state of country music today to the viral nature of their 1981 hit “Elvira” and the group’s friendship with the 41st President of the United States George H. W. Bush. He relates interesting anecdotes about playing in the Astrodome in Houston, and singing the National Anthem before a variety of sporting events.

On The Road With The Oak Ridge Boys is a light read and will be of special interest to fans of the group.

Learn more about Harvest House Publishers.

Learn more about The Oak Ridge Boys.

Purchase On the Road with The Oak Ridge Boys by Joseph S. Bonsall.

JT’s Ultimate Mixtape: Dio edition

Dio Ultimate

Ronnie James Dio’s voice was silenced five years ago, but his legacy lives on through the recordings made during his lifetime. His solo career followed stints in Ritchie Blackmore’s Rainbow and Black Sabbath. It was very difficult to make this Ultimate Mixtape because there are so many great songs, but rules are rules.

  • Every studio album must be represented by one and only one song.
  • That song does not have to be an official “single” released by the band to promote said album.
  • Compilation albums can be included, but only songs that are new, previously unreleased, or remixed songs from prior albums are eligible for the list.
  • Live albums are a great way to sneak additional songs into the mix. Can you imagine a Dio Ultimate Mixtape without “Rainbow in the Dark” and “Holy Diver”? Me neither.

Click play on the YouTube video, review my list, make your own, and buy some Dio today.

JT’s Ultimate Mixtape: Dio edition

Of course, Ronnie James Dio did much more in his career than just Dio. He also sang with Elf, Ritchie Blackmore’s Rainbow, Black Sabbath, and made several guest appearances on friends’ records. Below is just a small sampling of those projects. Explore more of Ronnie’s career at dio.net.


Bonus tracks:

What’s missing? What is on your Ultimate Mixtape: Dio edition that is not on mine?

Remembering Ronnie James Dio: Various Hard Rockers (part 2)

On May 16, 2010, the heavy metal world lost one of the most powerful voices it had ever known when Ronnie James Dio passed away.

The Hard Rock Nights radio program, hosted at that time by JT Carter, paid tribute by playing the songs of Dio and allowing musicians that played with Ronnie to share their memories with fans.

Sharing their thoughts and memories of Ronnie James Dio in this clips:

Remembering Ronnie James Dio: Various Hard Rockers (part 1)

On May 16, 2010, the heavy metal world lost one of the most powerful voices it had ever known when Ronnie James Dio passed away.

The Hard Rock Nights radio program, hosted at that time by JT Carter, paid tribute by playing the songs of Dio and allowing musicians that played with Ronnie to share their memories with fans.

Sharing their thoughts and memories of Ronnie James Dio in this clips:

Remembering Ronnie James Dio: Guitarist Robert Sarzo @SarzoRobert

On May 16, 2010, the heavy metal world lost one of the most powerful voices it had ever known when Ronnie James Dio passed away.

The Hard Rock Nights radio program, hosted at that time by JT Carter, paid tribute by playing the songs of Dio and allowing musicians that played with Ronnie to share their memories with fans.

Robert Sarzo played guitar for Hurricane. His brother, Rudy Sarzo, played bass on Dio’s 2006 Holy Diver: Live album.

Remembering Ronnie James Dio: Guitarist Tracy G

On May 16, 2010, the heavy metal world lost one of the most powerful voices it had ever known when Ronnie James Dio passed away.

The Hard Rock Nights radio program, hosted at that time by JT Carter, paid tribute by playing the songs of Dio and allowing musicians that played with Ronnie to share their memories with fans.

Tracy G joined Dio in 1993. In his six years with the band, the guitarist was featured on two studio albums, (Strange Highways and Angry Machines), and one live album (Inferno: Last In Live).

Remembering Ronnie James Dio: Bassist Chuck Garric @chuckgarric

On May 16, 2010, the heavy metal world lost one of the most powerful voices it had ever known when Ronnie James Dio passed away.

The Hard Rock Nights radio program, hosted at that time by JT Carter, paid tribute by playing the songs of Dio and allowing musicians that played with Ronnie to share their memories with fans.

Chuck Garric is a bass player who toured with Dio in 1999 – 2000 in support of the Magica record. Chuck also co-wrote the song “Death By Love”, which appeared on the Dio record Master Of The Moon.

Remembering Ronnie James Dio: Guitarist Rowan Robertson @RowanRobertson

On May 16, 2010, the heavy metal world lost one of the most powerful voices it had ever known when Ronnie James Dio passed away.

The Hard Rock Nights radio program, hosted at that time by JT Carter, paid tribute by playing the songs of Dio and allowing musicians that played with Ronnie to share their memories with fans.

Rowan Robertson was recruited to join the band Dio when he was only 17 years of age. The experience launched the young guitarist from obscurity to international fame nearly overnight. News that the band Dio had replaced departing guitarist Craig Goldy with an unusually young guitar player circulated in hard rock and heavy metal magazines such as Hit Parader, Rip, and Circus months before Robertson’s first and only album with the band, Lock Up the Wolves, was released.

The 50 Greatest Players in St. Louis Cardinals History by Robert W. Cohen (2015)

Cardinals book

The 50 Greatest Players in St. Louis Cardinals History
by Robert W. Cohen
Taylor Trade Publishing, 2015
386 pages

Every baseball team with a substantial amount of history behind it has those players who are undeniably great. Usually the top five or ten players can be generally agreed upon, even if the order of ranking them causes some debate among fans. The Yankees lay claim to Ruth, Gehrig, and DiMaggio. The Reds rest on Bench, Rose, and Robinson. Boston boasts Williams and Yaz. The Pirates, Clemente and Stargell. Likewise, the St. Louis Cardinals have their fair share of all-time greats, including Stan Musial, Rogers Hornsby, Albert Pujols, and Bob Gibson.

The further down the list you go, though, discussions become more heated and forgotten stars of the past are brought back into the spotlight. Robert W. Cohen presents a case for his rankings in The 50 Greatest Players in St. Louis Cardinals History, referencing a player’s season-by-season dominance in the league, as well as their statistical fortitude when compared to other Cardinals throughout history. Only a player’s time with St. Louis is considered in the rankings, but Cohen does not ignore their contributions to other teams in his short biographical sketches.

Everyone who has been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame with a Cardinals cap on the plaque is mentioned, and ranks highly in Cohen’s book. There are also players whose Hall of Fame cases were built in other cities, such as Steve Carlton and Orlando Cepeda, but their contributions as Cardinals were significant enough to warrant inclusion among the top fifty. Vince Coleman, Willie McGee, John Tudor, Edgar Renteria, and Terry Pendleton are just a few of the other names included among the fifty best.

Cohen’s style is a bit dry, relying on statistics to tell the narrative rather than examples of why the players should be considered. There are exceptions to this, such as the case of Joaquin Andujar, who checks in at number forty-nine. The author displays Andujar’s eccentricity through quotes such as, “You can’t worry if it’s cold; you can’t worry if it’s hot; you only worry if you get sick. Because then, if you don’t get well, you die.”

The 50 Greatest Players in St. Louis Cardinals History is well-researched and informative, and Cardinals fans will enjoy it. Readers whose fandom lies elsewhere, however, might struggle to make it through some of the chapters that lack entertaining anecdotes.

Learn more about Taylor Trade Publishing.

Purchase The 50 Greatest Players in St. Louis Cardinals History by Robert W. Cohen.